Hockey and cognitive neurophysiology

December 21, 2011 at 2:57 pm Leave a comment

Imagine you’re a hockey goalie, and two opposing players are breaking in alone on you, passing the puck back and forth. You’re aware of the linesman skating in on your left, but pay him no mind. Your focus is on the puck and the two approaching players. As the action unfolds, how is your brain processing this intense moment of “multi-tasking”? Are you splitting your focus of attention into multiple “spotlights?” Are you using one “spotlight” and switching between objects very quickly? Or are you “zooming out” the spotlight and taking it all in at once?

These are the questions Julio Martinez-Trujillo, a cognitive neurophysiology specialist from McGill University, and his team set out to answer in a new study on multifocal attention. They found that, for the first time, there’s evidence that we can pay attention to more than one thing at a time.

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Entry filed under: Biotechnology News and Info from Canadian Universities. Tags: , .

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