What does your heart and a bar of soap have in common?

May 28, 2012 at 3:48 pm Leave a comment

A study led by researchers from McGill University provides new insights into the structure of muscle tissue in the heart – a finding that promises to contribute to the study of heart diseases and to the engineering of artificial heart tissue.

The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveals that the muscle fibers in the heart wall are locally arranged in a special “minimal surface,” the generalized helicoid. The results add a significant new dimension to our understanding of the structure and function of heart-wall muscle fiber since minimal surfaces arise in nature as optimal solutions to physical problems. (A more familiar example of a minimal surface is the film that forms when a wireframe is dipped in a solution of soap.)

Read more…

Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

Are you a Scientist? Then you’ve got soul! How to bring a frog back from the dead

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


biorad1

Bio-Rad Canada has sponsored the development of this site to advance the productivity of the Canadian Biotechnology sector and the fine people who work in it across the country.  We invite readers to contribute content: posters, tools, research and presentations, articles white papers, multimedia, music downloads and entertainment, conference announcements, videos. Please contact info@cbt20.ca for more information.

Bookmark and Share

Site developed by What If What Next(TM)

Follow us on Twitter


%d bloggers like this: