Largest Ever Map of Human Protein Interactions

November 20, 2014 at 5:28 pm Leave a comment

One of the central questions in human biology is to understand how our genes determine which diseases we get and how severe they might be. Knowing just the DNA sequence, or the blueprint, is not enough. We must figure out how proteins, the genes’ products, work too.

Now an international team of researchers, jointly led by Dr. Fritz Roth (at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute and the Donnelly Centre of the University of Toronto), and Dr. Marc Vidal (with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in Boston), have produced the largest ever map of human protein interactions. This publicly available resource will be invaluable to anyone trying to understand complex genetic traits and develop new disease therapies.

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Entry filed under: Biotechnology News and Info from Canadian Universities. Tags: , .

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