Posts tagged ‘Canadian Biotechnologist2.0’

7 Reasons Why you Should Contribute Content and Comments to the Canadian BioTechnologist2.0 blog

1. Share your passion for science
Our blog is an excellent way to continuously maintain a presence within the Canadian science community and to contribute to scientific thought.

2. Be a part of the community
Join us and become a become part of a multi-threaded, ongoing science party.

3. Make connections
We have a good crowd that joins us on a daily basis. Participating might just provide you with connections that will aid you in future career endeavors. .

4. Help get the message out to science students
Students across the county visit the site. Telling the story of your career and passion for science might just inspire someone.

5. Become a better writer

Writing skills are important. Good writing wins grants and helps communicate research findings to the world. Writing for the blog will sharpen your ability to write well.

6. Get feedback on your own thoughts and/or research
Ever have a science or career related question and wish that you had someone to answer it? Google can work but its nothing like the information you get directly from someone with relevant experience. The Canadian Biotechnology Blog2.0 is designed, as all blogs are, to be a collection of conversations – conversations that lead to insightful opinions and thoughts.

7. Increase the visibility of yourself, your lab, your department, and your University
We are keen on getting your story on the blog. Email us and we can highlight your lab, department or school and the people that work and study in it.

June 15, 2012 at 3:57 pm Leave a comment

Call for Contributors to The Canadian Biotechnologist2.0 Blog

The Canadian Biotechnologist2.0 Blog is devoted to the productivity of the Canadian biotechnology sector and the fine people who take part in this profession across the country. We are inviting undergraduate and post-graduate students, bench scientists, and technologists to contribute content: posters, tools, research, presentations, articles, white papers, multimedia, music downloads and entertainment, conference announcements, videos, etc.

We are interested in publicizing the work of your lab and the people that work in it. Generally, we are looking for 250-500 word articles on the topic. Participating guest bloggers will gain recognition from the broader community, exposure to job opportunities, and personal exposure from page rankings on Google and other search engines. We are working toward building a broad community across Canadian labs. If you could pass this information along to anyone in your lab who may be interested in being a guest blogger, it would be highly appreciated.

We are also interested in learning about your personal insights on the biotechnology scene. Please take a few moments to answer the following questions so that we may publish your responses with attribution on the blog:
1. Briefly describe your current position and current interests.
2. What path brought you to this point?
3. What projects of interest (that you feel comfortable talking about) are occurring at your lab right now?
4. What trends do you see in the profession of biotechnology in academics and industry?
5. What advice can you give to students entering the field?
6. What blogs and other online sites do you use?
7. One goal of the blog is to introduce our audience to new methods, tools, and career advice. In your opinion, what relevant methods, research techniques, and protocols would help our readers?
8. From a blue-sky perspective, can you comment on the potential for online social networks to promote collaboration in the biotechnology community? Can social networks lead to the creation of new tools?
9. Can you comment of the shift in funding methods in the U.S. and how it will impact funding in Canada?
10. Is there any other content you would recommend, particularly tools that a broad biotechnology life sciences audience would find of interest?.

Cheers!

Howard Oliver
Blog Manager
Bio-Rad Laboratories (Canada) Ltd.
holiver@whatifwhatnext.com

May 25, 2012 at 2:35 pm Leave a comment

Biotechnology Clusters in Canada

Please visit this guide to the growing biotechnology sector in Canada organized by areas of activity.

Clink: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cbc-gccb.nsf/eng/home

December 28, 2011 at 12:44 pm Leave a comment

Biotechnology Kids

December 28, 2011 at 12:36 pm Leave a comment

Help Add Canadian Science Festivals to the Map!

Nature Networks in constantly in the process of updating their world map of science festivals. Unfortunately, out of hundreds of science festivals happening world-wide, only 3 Canadian events have made the list. These events include EurekaFest in Montreal, Science Rendezvous in Toronto and Maker Faire in Vancouver.

I KNOW that there are MANY, MANY other great science festivals in Canada. Help add our festivals to the Nature list and show the world that when it comes to science festivals, Canada is on the map!

October 17, 2011 at 7:13 am Leave a comment

When public perception and genomic research collide

In a white paper published earlier this year, researchers at GenomeBC discuss how recent advances in genomics has lead to an increased public awareness of “genome-related” issues and therefore requires the formulation of strategic policies focused on the integration of genomics with Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) research.

Canadian efforts at integration first began with the formation of Genome Canada in 2000, which has funded $40 Million in GE3LS (ethical, economic,environmental, legal and social implications of genomics research) research. These projects, together with CIHR funded efforts, have made Canada a leader in dealing with the interphase between genomic science and the creation of public policy dealing with genomics related issues.

Nonetheless, one of the biggest issues facing genomic science researchers is the difficulty they have in explaining how their research benefits society and therefore justifies their spendig of public tax dollars.

To read more on integration efforts and how GenomeBC intends to deal with these issues, download the Pathways to Integration white paper.

September 14, 2011 at 6:18 am 1 comment

Newly identified gene mutation linked to Parkinson’s

Less than two months after publishing findings about a new gene linked to late-onset Parkinson’s disease, the same team of scientists at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute have discovered another gene responsible for the neurodegenerative disease – providing yet another target for potential treatments.

The mutation, a single “spelling mistake” among three billion nucleotides in DNA, regulates the mechanism for converting a cell’s genetic code into proteins. The findings are published in The American Journal of Human Genetics.

Click here to read more.

September 11, 2011 at 6:53 am Leave a comment

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Bio-Rad Canada has sponsored the development of this site to advance the productivity of the Canadian Biotechnology sector and the fine people who work in it across the country.  We invite readers to contribute content: posters, tools, research and presentations, articles white papers, multimedia, music downloads and entertainment, conference announcements, videos. Please contact info@cbt20.ca for more information.

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