Posts tagged ‘research funding’

Top Canadian Research Hospitals

Research Infosource has just released the 2014 list of top 40 research hospitals. Not surprisingly, almost 50% of the top hospitals (19 out of 40) are located in Ontario. Quebec followed closely behind with 35% of the top hospitals located in that province. BC, Manitoba and Nova Scotia were each home to two of the top hospitals and Saskatchewan’s Saskatoon Regional Health Authority was the only hospital to be ranked among the top 40. Surprisingly, there were not top-ranked hospitals in Alberta, PEI, New Brusnwick and Newfoundland.

The 2013 research income for these 40 institutions reached $2.3 billion with the average dollar per researcher ranging from $956,000 at Mount Sinai’s Lunenfeld Research Institute in Ontario to $36,000 at Saskatoon’s Regional Health Authority.

It is also interesting to note the percent of total income that was derived from research activity for following top hospitals:

  • Hospital for Sick Children-24.2%
  • Mount Sinai’s Lunenfeld-21.7%
  • Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal-18.5%
  • University Health Network-16.2%

What is most interesting is the fact that the research institutes listed above are not uniform in their size with UHN considered a large hospital, Mount Sinai and Sick Kids considered mid-size hospitals and Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal classified as a small hospital.

My conclusion: if you are looking to work in a well-funded lab, your best bet is to stick to Ontario and Quebec. Since our readership hails from all across Canada, I would be interested in hearing your reaction to the numbers presented in this report.

November 5, 2014 at 4:06 pm Leave a comment

Queen’s University Lands Millions of Dollars in Research Grants

Fifty-eight Queen’s researchers have been awarded a total of $11.7 million in research grants from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) for 2014. The funding will help advance research projects in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“Support from NSERC and other partners is vital to facilitating new discoveries and innovations at Queen’s,” says Steven Liss, Vice-Principal (Research). “In a competitive funding environment, the fact that so many of our faculty members, graduate students and post-doctoral researchers have received these awards is a testament to the high quality of research happening on campus.”

 

Read more…

June 26, 2014 at 3:44 pm Leave a comment

Big Funding is No April Fool’s Joke

Over one hundred research labs were pleasantly surprised yesterday (April 1st) when they learned of the Canadian government’s plan to hand out more than $89 Million in research grants for Canadian Research Chairs across the country. In addition, the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), simultaneously announced that it was handing out over $3.6 Million in funding to help equip these labs with state of the art equipment and infrastructure.

As usual, the province of Ontario walked away with the largest chunk of funds, with $33.9 Million going to 39 labs across the province. Twenty two million was awarded to Quebec, followed by $15 Million to Alberta and $13 Million to British Columbia. Saskatchewan received the least amount of grant funding, with $500,000 going to Erika Dyck a History of Medicine professor at the University of Saskatchewan.

The full list of grants funded can be downloaded from the Canada Research Chair website.

April 2, 2014 at 2:07 pm Leave a comment

Is Canadian Research Funding In Trouble?

A story appearing in the Toronto Observer yesterday described anecdotal evidence of financial difficulties faced by Canadian researchers in recent years. According to the article, CIHR funding rates are expected to drop to 12% of submitted proposals from 27% of submitted proposals in 2000.

The article quotes Christopher Pin, an associate professor in the University of Western Ontario’s department of pediatrics, oncology, and physiology and pharmacology, as saying that the cuts have forced the University to become more politically-oriented with regards to what scientific areas they should be focusing on. Such a move is necessary in order to maximize the benefits of the ever-shrinking research budgets.

The article certainly sets a dismal tone for future biologists with the following knockout advice to budding scientists:

Go get a job somewhere else and come back when Canada is doing research again

On the other side of the coin, Industry Canada denies that Canada is experiencing a research funding crisis and insists that the 2014 federal budget included the largest increase to the granting councils in a decade.

With such conflicting information coming from both sides of the fence, it is hard to know which side represents facts on the ground. Have you experienced research funding prosperity or desperation in your lab?

March 20, 2014 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

U of T gets $190-million boost from Province of Ontario

Ontario Minister of Research and Innovation Reza Moridi came to the University of Toronto on January 20 with news that brightened up a cold day: the province is investing $190 million over the next six years to help attract and retain top researchers, develop innovative technologies, increase investment and create jobs.

The new funding will see $65 million going to the Ontario Research Fund’s Research Excellence program (ORF-RE) and $125 million to the Research Infrastructure (ORF-RI) program.

ORF-RE provides research institutions with funding to help support the operational costs of large-scale transformative research of strategic value to Ontario.

Read more…

January 22, 2014 at 4:27 pm Leave a comment

Are there really thousands of Canadian biotech jobs to be found?

An Ottawa-based national organization is trying to attract laid-off manufacturing workers to the biotech industry.

BioTalent Canada has launched an online tool encouraging workers in Ontario cities such as Brockville, Cornwall and Kitchener-Waterloo to help fill a nationwide skills shortage in biotechnology

Read Biotech recruiter targets unemployed workers on the CBCnews website.

Can you write in 75 words the current state of employment in the Canadian Biotechnology sector.

Let’s build our collective voice!

We all have skin in the game when it comes to building employment opportunities in biotechnology.

The media are watching this blog – lets get our unique point of view heard.

Related post:
If there’s a nation-wide biotech skills shortage, why is it so hard for PhDs to find a job?

September 23, 2012 at 8:58 am Leave a comment

If there’s a nation-wide biotech skills shortage, why is it so hard for PhDs to find a job?

I recently read a story on the Canadian NewsWire that has me quite confused. According to the report, BioTalent Canada (formerly the Biotechnology Human Resource Council) is launching a program aimed at training unemployed manufacturing workers with skills necessary for entering the biomanufacturing field. According to the report:

Many traditional manufacturing skills are transferable to the biomanufacturing field. But unemployed workers simply do not know this

.

The report concludes that Canadian biotechnology companies are currently suffering from a nation-wide skills shortage and that properly trained manufacturing workers can help alleviate this shortage.

Last time I checked, there were hundreds of newly graduated PhDs and postDocs who have not been able to find industry jobs despite their best attempts. Furthermore, their many years of university level training in some of the best programs in the country has not netted them any success. Am I missing something here??? How can there be a skills shortage on the one hand yet an excess supply of already trained skilled workers with no place to go? Why look to trained manufacturing workers in biotech when an already trained workfoce is readily available and willing to work?

February 8, 2012 at 3:33 pm 1 comment

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