Posts tagged ‘science’

Awesome Science Documentary!

Worth watching just for the introduction alone.

September 11, 2012 at 1:55 pm Leave a comment

Biotechnology News


Grade 11 Student Wins Biotechnology Challenge

A 17 year old student from Saskatchewan researching lentil disease resistance has earned the top prize in her provinces leg of the Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge Canada. Rui (ree) Song, who is a Grade 11 student at Walter Murrary Collegiate won the 2-thousand dollar prize and is now on her way to the national competition in Ottawa in May.

For more information click here

April 23, 2012 at 9:15 am Leave a comment

Canadian Internships: Biology and Biotechnology

Internship Description
These internships are designed for students in university biology programs and technical school biotechnology programs. Students work in combined administration and shadowing positions at laboratories or government agencies. They support researchers and observe biologists in their day to day duties.

How to Apply
Biology and biotech placements are available year round. To join a biology and biotech internship, you must be a participant in one of our three core programs.

CLINK: http://vancouverinternships.ca/internships/bio.html

March 22, 2012 at 8:52 am Leave a comment

Interesting Tweets from our Biotechnologist2.0 Community

In grad school a co-worker proposed a “Journal of Unpublishable Data” http://bit.ly/y8Ktmn

Just read a paper accusing everyone in my field of being “molecular voyeurs”… not sure how I feel about that.

How much more is a B.S. engineer paid than a Ph.D. chemist? How about 20k? http://bit.ly/yHiS65

What do you get if you cross an octopus with a cow? A stern rebuke from the Research Ethics Committee and an immediate cessation of funding.

Just downloaded a paper from “Ultramicroscopy”. My new life goal is to start a journal called “Megamicroscopy”

We are very active on Twitter. Please visit us at: http://bit.ly/GF4hmi

March 21, 2012 at 12:54 pm Leave a comment

A book to buy: Dreams and Due Diligence: Till & McCulloch’s Stem Cell Discovery and Legacy by Joe Sornberger

Book Description

In proving the existence of stem cells, Ernest Armstrong McCulloch and James Edgar Till formed the most important partnership in Canadian medical research since Frederick Banting and Charles Best, the discoverers of insulin. Together, Till and McCulloch instructed, influenced, and inspired successive generations of researchers who have used their findings to make huge advances against disease. Thousands of people who would have died from leukemia and immunological disorders now owe their lives to therapies developed from their discoveries.

Despite their accomplishments, Till and McCulloch remain largely unknown, and until now, their story has remained untold. Dreams and Due Diligence vividly chronicles the work of two researchers who made medical history – two men who possessed exactly the right complementary talents to achieve greatness and win nearly every award available in medical research. Bringing their legacy to life for the first time, Joe Sornberger provides a dramatic account of the development of stem cell research, one of today’s most ground-breaking medical scientific fields.

Clink HERE for more information.

March 7, 2012 at 2:12 pm Leave a comment

Biotechnology News: Journals asked to censor controversial bird flu studies

Both a Dutch and an American research team have managed to figure out a way to mutate the avian flu virus so that it can become highly transmissible among humans. The researchers seek to publish their findings to the journals Science and Nature.

The US government fears that the information could be used by bioterrorists and is asking the journals to publish only brief reports of the work. They’re worried that rogue teams might want to borrow the ideas to create deadly viruses of their own for bioterrorism.

Questions: Do you agree with this form of censorship? Is this an attack on scientific freedom or prudent reasoning?

CLINK: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20111222/h5n1-bird-flu-studies-journals-111222/#ixzz1hH8nwlC

December 22, 2011 at 10:02 am Leave a comment

Science for Christmas: Mistletoe A Kiss of Death?

Mistletoe: A kiss of death?

Suspended sprigs of mistletoe have kindled and rekindled many a holiday romance over the years, but the parasitic plant can be the kiss of death for trees.
Most mistletoe species make their own nutrients via photosynthesis, but grow on trees where they suck out water and minerals essential to their hosts’ long-term survival. And once infected, a tree is stuck with mistletoe until death. The plant itself is spread by birds, which eat the seeds and poop them out on other tree limbs.

December 22, 2011 at 2:05 am Leave a comment

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